Does anyone else struggle with ‘adulting’?


According to the Oxford Dictionary (online version), ‘adulting’ means behaving in a way characteristic of a responsible adult, especially the accomplishment of mundane but necessary tasks. I literally couldn’t even finish that sentence without yawning. Today I had no choice but to behave like a grown up and accomplish some grown up things, like paying my car registration, sorting out my online banking, picking up my new glasses…. blah blah blah. Mundane, necessary tasks alright. I’m sitting here like a bloody idiot congratulating myself for getting some adult shit done, but seriously – why do I find it so hard?

90% of the time I live in this dream-like state of mind, going between fantasy novels and TV shows, collecting shells, planning international holidays, and trying to completely escape the reality of things like work, cleaning and car maintenance. The other day my boyfriend asked me if I had insurance. How the hell am I supposed to know that? I’m nearly 30 and have managed to get this far by doing minimal life administration and I’m completely fine with that. I mean, I’m getting by right? I’ve completed two degrees, held down steady jobs, been a good friend and family member, a present girlfriend, a doting pet owner, and a responsible citizen. So what if I’m not good at keeping track of assets and paperwork? As far as I see it, life is much bigger than being proud of your organisational skills. I can cook an amazing Thai curry, manage to take my dog to the beach every day, and have a wonderfully close relationship with my grandparents. Maybe I just value different things?

I broke my toe on January 2nd, one hour before I was meant to go to work. 7 weeks later and no, I still haven’t gone to get an X-Ray. Oh it hurt like hell and went black for a good week, I struggled to walk for days and it’s still red and swollen. But hey, it’s just a little toe right? I’d rather spend my days off from work writing on my blog, puppy by my side, sipping a coffee and listening to music (Current situation = #winning). I’ll get to the X-Ray eventually, and in the meantime I’m perfectly happy living with the choices I’ve made.

On a side note, totally living for my herb garden right now! The boy and I managed to score this gorgeous blue vintage planter box for $50, and so far we have 3 types of chillies, 2 types of basil, rosemary, chives, tomatoes and a Kaffir lime tree. This little venture has brought me so much happiness – I mean what’s better than cooking up a pasta, red wine in hand, adding your own homegrown herbs? It’s just so wholesome I could cry.


Alright, time to be a grown up and hit the grocery store. Until next time 🙂

The never ending gift of travel


As I sit here day dreaming about the next destination on my bucket list (Thailand), I can’t help but think back to the places I’ve been so far, and how they keep making me smile. Travel (in the broad sense) is such a fountain of never ending joy – from the moment you even think about going somewhere, through all the excitement of planning, to the actual adventure itself. What you rarely hear about though is the post-travel smiles, as we are inclined to focus more on the reality of back-to-work blues. Just recently I’ve discovered a whole bag of beautiful hand made items I bought in my travels to South Africa about 11 years ago, still in perfect condition. Putting them out on display in my room has been a lovely walk down memory lane, not to mention a colourful addition to my collection.

Something I tend to do after I’ve been somewhere of significance (for example the Bali Bombings memorial in Kuta), is go and read everything I can about it afterwards. You’d think that would be the smart thing to do before visiting a destination, but for me the real significance of a place doesn’t hit me until I’m living in the moment, staring it in the face. The complete sensory overload you feel when visiting somewhere iconic (whether that be a place of beauty or sadness), can leave you either awe-struck or overwhelmed. Whatever the case may be, I think it’s incredibly important to see as many places of significance in the world as humanly possible. Viewing life through the screen of a TV or mobile isn’t living, it’s simply cutting yourself short from engaging with other cultures, people and experiences that will make your own life richer.

I’ve been pretty fortunate to visit some incredible places so far, from China, Singapore and Hawaii through to Indonesia, California and Vegas. Some of my standout memories and items to put on your own bucket lists would include:

  • The Great Wall of China
  • Kruger National Park in South Africa
  • The Drakensberg Mountains in South Africa
  • Ubud, Bali (Indonesia)
  • San Francisco, Santa Barbara and San Diego (California)
  • Pearl Harbour, Hawaii
  • The Road to Hana (Maui, Hawaiian Islands)

So here’s to turning day dreams into reality, working hard so you can play hard, and not letting life pass you by from the comfort of your couch. Catch me in the Emerald Cave in Thailand!

Fill your life with adventures, not things. Have stories to tell, not things to show.


Sometimes, a dose of normalcy is just what the doctor ordered.


I’m sitting here smiling with contentment tonight, having had a very simple, non-eventful day. No appointments, nowhere to be, and nothing in particular to do. How extremely boring! How exceedingly ordinary! Damn straight, and you know what? I absolutely LOVED it. In fact, sometimes all we need in life to re-group and just breathe for a minute is a day off. 24 hours away from the routine of work, meetings, appointments and people you’d rather not be stranded on a desert island with… you get the picture. So what does a dose of normalcy involve? Well everyone’s idea of a normal day is obviously different, but for a lot of us I imagine it involves simple things like cooking, doing laundry, walking the dog and eating dinner at a reasonable hour. So as I sit here paying respect to my annual viewing of the wonderful Love Actually, I can’t help but smile.

Sometimes I wonder why I didn’t get that craving to go off somewhere exotic like Ibiza and spend my nights partying till dawn, fuelling my body with all sorts of chemicals and making one-night memories with perfect strangers. It’s like I’ve skipped that stage and gone straight to wanting a comfortable lifestyle that involves fresh sheets, cups of tea and long walks on the beach. Does this make me boring? Don’t get me wrong, I lived the quintessential University lifestyle in my early 20’s. I did the share-housing, the packets of cheap pasta and even cheaper wine. I did the binge TV watching, the shitty parties and nights that ended in kebabs in the gutter. But at some point I realised that I was living a complete lie. Everything that my friends and I were doing at the time seemed at complete odds with what I really wanted, and it was time to stop apologising for that. Perhaps it comes from growing up under the roof of my Nana and Pop’s, but needless to say – I’ve come to an age where doing what I want is a breathe of fresh air.

If only the beauty of hindsight could benefit us at the time where we most need it, a lot of us wouldn’t waste so much time trying to please others. I remember the nights where all I wanted to do was light a candle and listen to some music, but my friends would beg me to come out. Having said that though, I most definitely don’t regret a thing about coming to know myself. We have to go through those phases of young adulthood to understand ourselves, figure out our values in life and what actually makes us happy. I think the most important thing to take away from any experience or phase in life, is to simply treat it as a learning curve. It’s about the journey – not the destination, and finding that perfect balance can be the sweetest, most satisfying thing we ever realise.


Why does nostalgia give us the warm and fuzzies?


You hear it now and again, that funny saying ‘Everything old is new again’… So what does it actually mean? For tangible things like fashion, music and décor it obviously references the continuous cycle that we go through as a society, with ‘trends’ coming and going through the decades. A social media ‘influencer’ will wear a 70’s style outfit and low and behold, every 16-24 year old is suddenly dressing like Stevie Nicks and taking up smoking. For futuristic thinkers caught up in a tech bubble lifestyle, there’s no time for the past. For me personally, I think it’s a beautiful thing to look backwards – as long as you know when it’s time to come home.

I could easily spend my weekends wandering through Antique markets, imagining the lives of all the people who have parted ways with their little trinkets, velvet couches and wooden stools. How many cups of tea were shared amongst these porcelain sets? How many bedtime stories were told across these fading books? How many loved ones were lost? The feeling of nostalgia one gets while surrounded by memories, objects and things is hard to describe. It’s like a warm bath, a long awaited hug, or a roast meal. It’s a sense of comfort, contentment and appreciation. It’s a moment to be grateful for, and a moment to just BE in. No distractions, no emails to answer, and nobody waiting on you.

Every time my Nana has a garage sale I shed a silent tear for the things she’s giving away. For the Encyclopaedia’s I grew up looking at, now gathering dust on the shelves. For the bright orange containers, green vases and cane chairs. For everything that was my childhood, and hers, that will now be someone else’s. But I guess that’s the beauty of it – what’s old is new again. Objects are funny things – they go from family to family, house to house, all the while remaining the same (with a little wear and tear), while people change and move on. I look forward to the day where I can pass on items from my childhood to my own grandchildren, and explain the history behind them. While they might not completely understand, I hope I can transport them there for just a moment. For now though, I hope to live more presently in the now and appreciate what time I have.

“How could she feel nostalgia when he was right in front of her? How can you suffer from the absence of a person who is present?

You can suffer nostalgia in the presence of the beloved if you glimpse a future where the beloved is no more”
Milan Kundera


Photo credits – bryanadamc & theseafiles

This Christmas, take a minute to appreciate just how lucky you are.


As I sit here in the comfort of my air conditioned lounge room on a Friday night, having just shared a lovely meal with my Grandparents, I have to pinch myself and smile. I am so darn lucky. How can I justify complaining about silly things like feeling tired, or having to go to work, when every night I get to sleep under a roof, and every fortnight I get paid? How can I complain about being hot when at the flick of a switch I can be cool, or go and jump in a pool? (That was absolutely not meant to rhyme by the way). Point being – the little things that annoy the majority of us, are the things that some people wish they could complain about.

This Christmas I challenge you (and myself) to stop and think before you go to complain about something relatively insignificant. There are people on every street, on every block, who don’t know how they are going to afford the rent this month. Who don’t have anything to buy their children. Who don’t know what they’re going to eat on Christmas, let alone tomorrow or the next day. Yes, you’re tired. You’re probably exhausted from working hard to ensure everything is done by Christmas so you can enjoy a couple of days off. You’re probably feeling guilty about over-indulging in festive treats and after-office drinks. You’re worried that your Mum won’t like the gift you got her, or that you got the kids the wrong colour. You’re wondering when you’ll have time to walk the dog, or buy the groceries. But just STOP for a minute and appreciate how lucky you are, because you really, really are.

Every day I feel so incredibly blessed to have my grandparents still with me, to share simple moments with them and (hopefully) learn from them as well. Watching my Pop grow to love the new puppy in our life, after initially not being too interested, has been a beautiful transition to see. Every time she comes over she runs straight to Pop’s feet for a belly rub, and the love between them is hard to miss. Seeing Nana fret over her too really melts my heart. From making sure she has a little bowl of water and plate of warmed mince, to worrying over her head getting sore from the way she sleeps with it all tucked into her belly, just really makes me smile. I could complain about little things like our puppy still having accidents in the house, or barking at the postman, but in all honesty she’s been a light in my life this year. It’s the small moments that count, and seeing the magic in every day has been something that I’ve learnt to appreciate.

“My idea of Christmas, whether old-fashioned or modern, is very simple: loving others. Come to think of it, why do we have to wait for Christmas to do that?”

Bob Hope. 


Photo credits – stylemagazines & minimalliving

Don’t sweat the small stuff… And it’s all small stuff.


A close friend once gave me a book entitled ‘Don’t sweat the small stuff. And it’s all small stuff.’ It’s funny how you look back on things in life and wonder why you wasted so much time stressing over little things that didn’t really matter. Of course, they mattered at the time to you, and try as we might humans haven’t mastered the art of hindsight to apply it in real time. As I’ve gotten older I’ve learnt to stress less, live in the moment and let things happen naturally. Don’t get me wrong – this method of living is still a work in progress and I get caught up in ‘small stuff’ all the time, but the point is I’m trying. And that’s all we can really do, isn’t it?

The other night after a long (and hung-over) day at work, I was looking forward to a nice sleep in a comfortable bed, snuggling my little dachshund. Naturally, things didn’t go as planned. I got home late and in addition to my little Audrey smelling like the lamb bone she had been chewing on all day, she proceeded to go to the toilet all over the fresh sheets on my bed. What did I do? I could have been really upset and annoyed at her (and trust me I was for about 5 minutes), but after seeing her sad little eyes looking at me after getting yelled at, my heart melted and I realised that it didn’t matter. The sheets could be washed, and so could she. What mattered was that we were both happy to see each other, and she felt safe and protected in her home. Laugh it off I say. There’s absolutely no point getting worked up over things that aren’t even going to matter in 10 minutes.

“Where’d the days go, when all we did was play? And the stress that we were under wasn’t stress at all just a run and a jump into a harmless fall”
Paolo Nutini


Photo credits – lensofourlives & hellolunchlady

G’day mate… What’s not to love about Australia?


This month I’m lucky enough to be doing quite a lot of travel – from the small mining town of Moranbah in Regional Queensland, across to the Margaret River wine region in Western Australia, to the picturesque Whitsundays for my 28th birthday. To be honest I’ve been living out of a bag all year, dividing my time between Nana’s, Mum’s and the boyfriends house, so spending the next few weeks living out of a suitcase is going to be pretty normal. What am I most looking forward to? Seeing what this beautiful country has to offer and discovering local secrets. You can’t just sit in your lounge room watching life go past on a TV screen, you’ve got to get out and enjoy it… and that’s exactly what I plan on doing.

So here I am 4 days into my ‘rural’ experience in Moranbah, about 2 hours drive inland from Mackay. A town that was built to accommodate families working in the coal mining industry, full of reliable locals and tradies in high visability work wear. There’s a certain peace to the town, an orderly silence and comfortable pace. People keep saying to me I’ll get sick of it, and maybe I would. But since I’m only here for a week I plan on making the most of it, exploring the outskirts and getting a glimpse of this multi-billion dollar industry: coal mining. To say you live in a regional area fuelled by the mining industry is one thing, but to see it in action is another. My boyfriend took me for a drive into the centre of his mine site, a trip which took nearly half an hour alone and that’s only covering half of it. To see an operation of such epic proportions is pretty eye-opening. This gigantic earth moving equipment is like something out of a Star Wars movie, and while I don’t feel that comfortable actually seeing the ground ripped up and displaced, it’s something I appreciate being shown.

Next on my tour will be a 6 hour flight over to Perth, Western Australia for my third visit. I honestly cannot get enough of this stunning place, from the gorgeous coastline to the funky suburban cafes, to the bushland wineries and gourmet cuisine, Perth has something for everyone. I’ll be catching up with one of my oldest friends over there, someone who has had my back since about Grade 5. We’ve gone through big life changes together and sometimes fall out of touch, but every time we get together it’s as if nothing has changed. We’ve booked a dinner and drinks cruise along the Swan River, and a half day wine tour (with cheese and chocolate stops along the way!). If you haven’t ever thought about including Perth on your bucket list, I strongly recommend you do. Trust me, it’s worth it.

Lastly I’ll be wrapping up the year by celebrating my birthday with 2 nights in Airlie Beach, a quaint coastal community known as the gateway to the Whitsunday Islands. My plans include cocktails on the water, and not a whole lot more. This time last year I was in a really bad place, so I’m incredibly grateful to be feeling this optimistic and excited about things. There’s nothing quite like the support of family, friends and your partner to lift you up, but ultimately the fighting spirit must come from within – the most challenging and important lesson I’ve learnt from this year. Thank you to everyone who has made my year 100 times better than the last, and looking forward to more wonderful times ahead 🙂